What Is the Service Contract Act Called Now

The Service Contract Act, also known as SCA, is a federal law that was enacted in 1965. The act aims to ensure that employees who work on contracts with the federal government are paid fair wages and benefits. The SCA is enforced by the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor (DOL).

Over the years, the SCA has undergone several changes. In 1972, the SCA was amended to include service employees in the Executive Branch of the government. In 2004, the SCA was amended again to include additional benefits, such as health and welfare benefits, for service employees.

Today, the SCA is known as the McNamara-O`Hara Service Contract Act. This is in honor of two lawmakers, Senator Robert McNamara and Representative Patsy Mink, who played key roles in the amendment of the SCA in the 1970s.

Under the McNamara-O`Hara Service Contract Act, contractors who perform services for the federal government must adhere to certain requirements. For example, contractors must pay their employees at least the prevailing wage rate for the work they perform. They must also provide certain benefits, such as health and welfare benefits, to their employees.

The McNamara-O`Hara Service Contract Act applies to all types of service contracts with the federal government, including janitorial, maintenance, security, and food service contracts. The act ensures that employees who work on these contracts are paid fairly and have access to important benefits.

In summary, the Service Contract Act is now known as the McNamara-O`Hara Service Contract Act. This federal law requires contractors who work for the federal government to pay their employees fair wages and provide certain benefits. The Wage and Hour Division of the DOL enforces the act and ensures that contractors comply with its requirements.

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